• The New York Arbitration Convention

    on the Recognition and Enforcement of
    Foreign Arbitral Awards, New York, 10 June 1958

    Alt tekst hier
  • The New York Arbitration Convention

    on the Recognition and Enforcement of
    Foreign Arbitral Awards, New York, 10 June 1958

    Alt tekst hier
  • The New York Arbitration Convention

    on the Recognition and Enforcement of
    Foreign Arbitral Awards, New York, 10 June 1958

    Alt tekst hier
  • The New York Arbitration Convention

    on the Recognition and Enforcement of
    Foreign Arbitral Awards, New York, 10 June 1958

    Alt tekst hier

In Brief

The Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards, done in New York, 10 June 1958 (the New York Convention), is described as the most successful treaty in private international law. It is adhered to by more than 140 nations. The more than 1,400 court decisions reported in the Yearbook: Commercial Arbitration show that enforcement of an arbitral award is granted in almost 90 per cent of the cases. 

The two basic actions contemplated by the New York Convention are the recognition and enforcement of foreign arbitral awards and the referral by a court to arbitration.

1. Recognition and enforcement of foreign arbitral awards

The first action is the recognition and enforcement of foreign arbitral awards, i.e., arbitral awards made in the territory of another (Contracting) State.

This field of application is defined in Article I. The general obligation for the Contracting States to recognize such awards as binding and to enforce them in accordance with their rules of procedure is laid down in Article III. A party seeking enforcement of a foreign award needs to supply to the court (a) the arbitral award and (b) the arbitration agreement (Article IV).

The party against whom enforcement is sought can object to the enforcement by submitting proof of one of the grounds for refusal of enforcement which are limitatively listed in Article V(1). The court may on its own motion refuse enforcement for reasons of public policy as provided in Article V(2).

If the award is subject to an action for setting aside in the country in which, or under the law of which, it is made ("the country of origin"), the foreign court before which enforcement of the award is sought may adjourn its decision on enforcement (Article VI).

Finally, if a party seeking enforcement prefers to base its request for enforcement on the court's domestic law on enforcement of foreign awards or bilateral or other multilateral treaties in force in the country where it seeks enforcement, it is allowed to do so by virtue of the so-called more-favourable-right provision of Article VII(1).

2. Referral by a court to arbitration

The second action contemplated by the New York Convention is the referral by a court to arbitration. Article II(3) provides that a court of a Contracting State, when seized of a matter in respect of which the parties have made an arbitration agreement, must, at the request of one of the parties, refer them to arbitration (unless the arbitration agreement is invalid).

In both actions the arbitration agreement must satisfy the requirements of Article II(1) and (2) which include in particular that the agreement be in writing.

NYC Texts

NYC Texts

Click here for: Authentic Texts and Non-Authentic Translations of the New York Convention

 

 

Court Decisions

Court Decisions

Click here for quick access to all court decisions that are relevant to any particular issue ("Topic") that has arisen under the Convention in practice: The consolidated list of court decisions